Introducing the Shorty Industry Awards

Best use of a video as part of a social media campaign

Social media campaigns that have gone beyond text and are incorporating video in their outreach on Twitter and Facebook.

Overview: British actor Daniel Radcliffe, best known for his title role in the Harry Potter movie series, offered his support to the Trevor Project, a 24‐hour suicide prevention hotline for LGTBQ youth. The goal of this campaign is to raise enough money to cover 5,000 calls to The Trevor Lifeline. Radcliffe appeared in a video encouraging fans to interested in supporting the Trevor Project to go to a dedicated page on partner website SocialVibe.com. Los Angeles‐based SocialVibe.com is a start‐up that organizes cause‐related social campaigns for large companies and organizations. Trevor Project supporters go to the SocialVibe site, create a personal profile, complete short activities created by large recognizable brands, and in turn those brands give money to the cause. SocialVibe activities include answering short questions that help brands with market research. In return, participants get to make donations without opening their wallets. When more people participate, more money is raised. The Trevor Lifeline campaign is still ongoing, and the video is available for viewing and sharing on YouTube. The Trevor Project is a two‐time Shorty Award finalist.

Impact: So far the campaign has raised $5,424 and attracted 4,256 supporters, which is enough to sponsor 1,475 of the 5,000 calls. A previous campaign run by the SocialVibe.com funded more than 2,000 conversations for The Trevor Project’s free instant messaging service, TrevorChat.


Overview: Ken Block is a professional rally racer with the Monster World Rally Team who is sponsored by DC Shoes. He has become known for Gymkhana racing, a relatively new motorsport featuring such complex courses that in order to achieve fast racing times, racers are said to memorize the course. Block set up his first “Gymkhana Practice” course in 2008 at a Marine Corps air station in California, and made the sequel, Gymkhana Two, in 2009. The resulting videos from both became YouTube sensations. Ad Age named Gymkhana Two one of “The Top 10 Viral Ads of All Time.” For the Gymkhana Three Project in fall 2010, which was promoted by advertising firm Mad Media, Block was filmed at the Autodrome de Montlhéry in Paris. The 1.58‐mile oval track built in 1924 features banks as steep as 51 degrees, which is more than double the standard 25 incline of most NASCAR ovals. Chosen by Block for this specific reason, the ramp‐like banking proved to be a unique and exciting challenge. The driving physics for the stunts Block performed were totally unknown until he attempted the maneuvers during filming. Gymkhana Three Part 1 featured a music video and infomercial, while Part 2 showed Block driving the course.

Impact: “Gymkhana Three, Part 2” had more than seven million page views in its first week, and has had more than 28 million views to date. It received numerous awards, including YouTube’s official list of the “Top 10 Videos of 2010” and Ad Age’s list of “Top Viral Videos of 2010.” Collectively, the Gymkhana videos have been viewed more than 90 million times globally.


Finalists

Play 99.6’s All Schools Talent Show

Overview: Play 99.6, a Jordan‐based radio station, has the leading share in the market with a wide audience throughout the Middle East. The station hosts off‐air events that included the nation’s first talent show to gather competitors from all the schools in the country. The aim of Play 99.6’s “All Schools Talent Show” was to create the first socially‐empowered virtual talent show audition process in the Middle East. Social networking solutions company The Online Project arranged to hold the auditions via YouTube. Students short listed by the radio station were invited to a branded venue to record their auditions. Clips of each audition were then uploaded onto YouTube. The participants, armed with a handbook on social networking provided by Play 99.6, were encouraged to generate interest in their clips by tapping their own social groups. The participant with the most votes was then guaranteed a spot in the talent show, while a panel of judges selected the rest of the participants. By empowering participants with the handbook, the station taught young participants the value of believing in their own talents and promoting themselves through different techniques.

Impact: The socially‐fueled audition process generated over 250,000 views on YouTube. Each branded clip contained show details such as the date and ticket price, becoming an extended advertisement for the show, resulting in full attendance.


Weezer’s YouTube Invasion

Overview: For the launch of their 2010 album “Hurley,” the American alternative rock band Weezer offered themselves to more than a dozen amateur filmmakers to film whatever they wanted and post the results on YouTube. DashGo, Weezer’s distribution and marketing firm, helped with the unique effort. Instead of hiring a cast to create a video about Weezer, the band members cast tapped popular Internet shows such as AutoTune the News, Fred, Hot For Words, and Ray William Johnson to do the direction, and cast themselves in the videos. The filmmakers’ videos, uploaded over the course of one day to YouTube, reached more than 10 million subscribers.

Impact: In less than 24 hours, the new Weezer videos garnered over 5 million views. To date, the campaign has passed 20 million cumulative views and helped propel album sales 30% over projections.

Entry Form

Shorty Industry Awards are designed for advertising and web agencies, companies, and social media professionals. Unlike the other Shorty Award categories, there is an entry fee of $299 plus a late fee of $100 (for entries made after February 11, 2011). The submission deadline for late entries is February 25, 2011.

If you haven't already read about the Shorty Industry Awards, please see the Call for entries →.

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This industry category is for agencies, companies and social media professionals. The entry fee is $299 plus a late fee of $100 for entries made after February 11, 2011. You will be taken to Paypal to complete your submission.

We encourage you to also check out the general Shorty categories which are free and open to everyone. There's no limit to how many categories you can enter.